UNO Card Game (2013 Refresh)

RRP: £8.99

NOW £6.99
RRP £8.99

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Experience Fast Fun for Everyone! with UNO. Race to get rid of all your cards by matching colour or number, or use an action card to really turn up the heat. When you are down to one card, don’t forget to yell ?UNO!? The first player to discard all cards wins.
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Category Tags , , , , , , SKU ZBG-MATY3365 Availability 5+ in stock
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Awards

Pick-Up & Play
Fun for Kids

Rating

  • Artwork
  • Complexity
  • Replayability
  • Player Interaction
  • Component Quality

You Might Like

  • Simplicity itself
  • Appeals to a wide audience
  • A lot of laughs

Might Not Like

  • Just too simple; lacks depth
  • Inverse snobbery of playing a ‘traditional family game'
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Description

UNO the card game is almost 50 years old, and it’s still going strong today. The aim of UNO is simple… Try to get rid of all your cards, the quickest! It takes 30 seconds to explain the rules, and even less than that to set up the game.

You’ll need some smart hand-management skills, alongside the grace of Lady Luck to win a game of UNO. Up to ten players can join in the madness, with each player starting with a hand of cards. There are standard number cards (0-9), and some action cards. There are four colours – red, blue, yellow and green. On your turn you get to play one card from your hand. It must match either the colour of the previously played card, or it must match the number. If you can’t meet those requirements: tough luck! You’ll have to draw a card from the deck and add it to your hand.

UNO is devious, because of some of the sneaky cards in the pack that feature ‘take that’ elements. Some make the next player skip a turn. Other cards switch the order of play from clockwise to counter-clockwise (or vice versa). Some cards force the next player to pick up two cards. There are two types of Wild Card too, that let you select a colour the next player must play. The most dreaded card is the Wild Card that forces the next player to pick up four cards!

Whenever a player gets down to one card left, they must declare, “UNO!” when they play their penultimate card. If not, they cannot win on their next turn, even if they can legally place their last card. Forgetfulness forces you to pick up an extra card, instead. UNO by Mattel is a simple card game that anyone can play, whether you’re 6 or 96 years old.

Player Count: 2-10 players
Time: 30 minutes
Age: 6+

 

One game to rule them all

I can’t imagine a time without Uno. It is the quintessential family game and I mean that in the most positive sense. It's ready to deploy to any audience at any occasion, safe in the knowledge that fun, laughter and good conversation will follow. If you don’t have a copy, then you need to take a good look at yourself, ask some uncompromising questions... and then make the small but worthwhile investment to add it to your shelf.

Simplicity itself

Each player is dealt 7 cards with the objective of being the first to get rid of them all on the common, face up discard pile. The cards are in four colours, each colour has the numbers 0 to 9 and some symbol cards, with functions like, change direction, skip a player and next player pick up 2. There are also a number of straight wild cards and a number of wilds that force the next player to pick up 4. In your turn you try to play a card from your hand to the discard.

This could be the same colour as the face card. It could be the same number or symbol, or it could be a wild card of some type. If you can’t play you pick up; if that card can be played it is immediately, and if not it is added to your hand. When you have one card in your hand you must remember to say ‘Uno' or pay a forfeit of picking up 4 cards. If you are first to lay your last card you win the round. The other players total the face value of the cards in their hand, scoring 20 for coloured symbols and 50 for wild cards.

Two options exist for overall game scoring: either the player who goes out gets the sum of these totals and the first to 500 wins. Or each player keeps their own score, the game ends when one player hits 500 and then the player with the lowest score wins.

Take that and party

It’s simple, quick to teach, quick to play, and enormous fun. The game is permeated with constant ‘take that' plays which normally have everyone guffawing (possibly even the victim). And the sting is drawn because change direction cards mean you will likely be repaying the favour soon. Likewise, the whole  thing is so quick and low stakes that it’s hard to take being done-over too seriously. There is some light tactical hand management around the use of symbol and wild cards which bears some thought. For example, holding onto wilds can make for an easy finish, but if you get it wrong and someone beats you to the finish that’s 50 points in your hand.

So much to love

I love the fact that I had to read the rules before I wrote this and my rules are different, as are my parents' rules: every time we sit down there is some light bartering over how we are playing. I love that everyone in the family loves it – its a go to for three generations to sit and play together with levels of cheeky banter that  wouldn’t be countenanced otherwise. I think its fabulous to find  that there is a ‘traditional family game' that’s actually fun to play. It always amuses me that our copy is held together as  a deck with an hair elastic and that individual cards keep appearing around the house; it doesn’t matter, there’s absolutely nothing precious about Uno other than the moments of joy you will have playing it with those closest to you.

Zatu Score

Rating

  • Artwork
  • Complexity
  • Replayability
  • Player Interaction
  • Component Quality

You might like

  • Simplicity itself
  • Appeals to a wide audience
  • A lot of laughs

Might not like

  • Just too simple; lacks depth
  • Inverse snobbery of playing a traditional family game'