Jurassic World Evolution 2 – PS5

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Pre-Order now for three unique vehicle skins inspired by 1997’s iconic The Lost World: Jurassic Park to use across your Ranger Team, Capture Team, and Mobile Vet Unit teams in Challenge and Sandbox modes, and get even closer to the films! Jurassic World Evolution 2 is the much-anticipated sequel to Frontier’s highly successful Jurassic World Evolution, building upon the ground-b…
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Awards

Rating

  • Graphics
  • Multiplayer
  • Story (Career Mode)
  • Originality

You Might Like

  • Visually impressive
  • Puts the player in complete control of a Dino Park
  • New ‘Chaos Theory’ mode is full of fan service

Might Not Like

  • Campaign Mode is very short
  • Some features are still a bit clunky
  • Can quickly eat up hours of your time
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Description

Pre-Order now for three unique vehicle skins inspired by 1997’s iconic The Lost World: Jurassic Park to use across your Ranger Team, Capture Team, and Mobile Vet Unit teams in Challenge and Sandbox modes, and get even closer to the films!

Jurassic World Evolution 2 is the much-anticipated sequel to Frontier’s highly successful Jurassic World Evolution, building upon the ground-breaking and immersive 2018 management simulation. It introduces a compelling, new narrative campaign, incredible new features, and awe-inspiring new dinosaurs brought to life with captivating authenticity. Together with expanded construction and more customisation options, the result is an even bigger, better and authentic Jurassic World game.

Features:
• An original Jurassic Story: Immerse yourself in a compelling and original Jurassic World narrative set after the Earth-shattering events of Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. Lead efforts to control, conserve and contain dinosaurs as you work alongside iconic characters from the films, including Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum), Claire Dearing (Bryce Dallas Howard) and Dr. Henry Wu (BD Wong).
• Create your own Jurassic World: Take control with deeper management tools and creative options. Construct and customise new buildings and flex your managerial muscle across never-before-seen locations ranging from dense forests to rocky deserts. Rescue and bioengineer more than 75 prehistoric species, including highly requested flying and marine reptiles, and watch them seek territory, fight and interact with staggering realism.
• Play with Chaos Theory: Chaos Theory mode lets you play through key moments of your favourite films - with a twist. Experience "what-if" scenarios from iconic Jurassic World and Jurassic Park films, with each level set across eras and locations from all five movies. Immerse yourself at the heart of the Jurassic World franchise and see how things turn out when you are put at the helm of managing new challenges with unpredictable outcomes.

Jurassic Park hit the big screen in 1993, kicking off what would go on to become one of the biggest franchises in mainstream cinema.While most of the movies have been well received, the same can’t be said when it comes to licensed video games.

Over the years, Jurassic Park games have varied wildly in style. There have been first-person and top-down shooters, platformers, point-and-click puzzlers, strategy games… you name it. There was even a bizarre selection of horrible mini-games for the ill-fated 3DO.

The earlier games reviewed well, but the vast majority were either distinctly average or outright terrible. 2003’s ‘Operation Genesis’ was one of the few that stood out, and 15 years later Jurassic World Evolution came along as a spiritual successor.

Evolution reviewed equally well, yet critics did point out a handful of things that didn’t quite work. Which brings us to Jurassic World Evolution 2.

Have Frontier Development improved upon the original? Or were they ‘so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should’?

Let’s find out!

What Is Evolution

For those of you not familiar with the first game, allow me to elaborate.

The Evolution games are similar Bullfrog’s ‘Theme Park’ series. But instead of fun kids rides, the main draw is a whole host of genetically engineered dinosaurs. Absolutely stunning genetically engineered dinosaurs, at that. Instead of the odd guest feeling a bit queasy, there’s a strong possibility they might get eaten. Attractions don’t break down, they break out, with devastating consequences.

Players are responsible for almost every facet of their park; from what creatures to breed, right down to how much it costs to use the toilet. Excavations, breach containment, feeding, medical treatment, scientific research; all the responsibility of the player. It may sound overwhelming at first. But the intuitive menus and controls, alongside a strong ‘help’ system make 99% of tasks a doddle.

Jurassic World Evolution 2: A New Breed

At first glance Evolution 2 doesn’t seem that different from its predecessor. The environments and the dinos still look beautiful, and the layout and menus are immediately familiar. For the most part the concept remains the same. Jump into the campaign mode though, and you’ll start to see how things have changed.

Evolution tasked the player with creating parks across a range of islands, each one more difficult than the last. Difficulty came in the form of tougher objectives and new gameplay mechanics, such as tropical storms and more aggressive breeds of dinosaurs.

Besides working toward key objectives, players were also set optional tasks by three heads of departments. Although optional, keeping them happy was often crucial, and this led to some of the criticism the original game received. One main gripe was that they would often set tasks that just weren’t achievable at that point in the game. As a result, players could spend hours on a single island trying to snag that elusive 5-Star park rating.

In Evolution 2 things are quite a bit different, at least in the Campaign mode anyway.

Campaign Mode Has Devolved

Taking place after the events of the Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom movie, Evolution 2’s campaign mode is set in the US.

Dinosaurs are at large in the wilderness. Rather than researching and breeding them as was the norm in the first game, the onus is now on catching the more problematic ones in the wild. Once securely penned, things do get a bit more familiar, and caring for the prehistoric beasties is still a big focus. That includes creating the perfect environment, feeding them and making sure they don’t get sick. Oh, and most importantly, ensuring they don’t escape.

Campaigns feel much snappier as a result, but that’s because this mode is little more than a tutorial now. All the new campaigns are very linear, with no shortage of money and lots of hand holding. They do provide a fun way to get acquainted with the mechanics though, ahead of tackling some of the other modes.

Absolute Chaos

‘Chaos Theory’ is a new mode introduced in Jurassic World Evolution 2, providing a ‘What if…’ scenario for players. It allows them the opportunity to tackle iconic set-pieces from each of the Jurassic Park/World movies, and do it their way.

See how things could have played out on Isla Nublar had Dennis Nedry not shut down the power in JP1. Deal with a T-Rex rampaging around San Diego in the aftermath of JP2: Lost World. Ensure the Indominus Rex stays caged at the Jurassic World Resort.

You get the idea.

Here the gameplay is much more familiar to those who played the first Evolution title. There have been some great quality of life improvements though. Scientists can take on multiple roles but eventually need rest. Object placement is less clunky and seems to ‘snap’ to other objects more reliably.

As for content, there are new options to choose from in almost every category, keeping things fresh despite the familiarity of it all. This applies to every mode other than Campaign in fact. The introduction of Omni-movers being one fun (but potentially deadly) example amongst them. Another being aviaries, which allow for the new flying-type dinosaurs to be featured.

A Familiar Challenge

Challenge mode was introduced in multiple updates for the first Evolution game, and makes a welcome return here. Players can choose from 8 maps featured elsewhere in the game, set a difficulty level and see if they have what it takes to hit the various set goals.

This is the most traditional way to play the game. It allows plenty of freedom, but still provides a challenge due to constraints on funding and what the win condition has been set to. It doesn’t have a storyline though, which may be a problem for players who like to have a narrative purpose.

Finally, for players who don’t want to be tied down at all there is also a Sandbox mode. This grants complete omnipotence in exchange for the opportunity to unlock more features.

Successful Sequencing

Have Frontier Development’s attempts to re-sequence the genome and iron out the problems with the Evolution DNA worked?

Yes and no.

The stunning visuals are still here, the audio is still atmospheric and evocative of the movies, and there have been solid improvements to gameplay. Chaos Theory is a fantastic addition, offering unrivalled fan service to die-hard Jurassic Park lovers, but the game still has a few flaws. Certain breeds are still near-impossible to manage (Raptors, I’m looking at you) and often it’s easier to not have them if the objectives allow for it.

Sure, it’s realistic. But in a game about dinosaurs realism could have been sacrificed in favour of making things a bit more fun. While the help system is great, sometimes how to do something isn’t immediately obvious.

Jurassic World Evolution 2 will often tell the player they can’t do something, but not WHY they can’t do it. Or in fact how to do it correctly. I found looking online to figure out how to put in place the stations for the people movers, for example.

Life Finds A Way

Ultimately these are small issues in what is otherwise a fantastic business management simulator.

Fans of the first game will find enough new content to in Evolution 2 to make it a worthwhile purchase. Anyone who enjoyed games like Theme Park and Zoo Tycoon should get a kick out of this too.

Be careful though. Jurassic World Evolution 2 has an addictive nature, meaning you’ll find yourself saying ‘just a few more minutes’ quite a bit. Before you know it, you’ll have been playing for hours.

If you love the Jurassic Park franchise and ever had dreams of putting together your own park, you won’t find a more entertaining way to do it than this.

Zatu Score

Rating

  • Graphics
  • Multiplayer
  • Story (Career Mode)
  • Originality

You might like

  • Visually impressive
  • Puts the player in complete control of a Dino Park
  • New Chaos Theory mode is full of fan service

Might not like

  • Campaign Mode is very short
  • Some features are still a bit clunky
  • Can quickly eat up hours of your time