Gizmos

RRP: £32.99

NOW £29.19
RRP £32.99

Phil Walker-Harding has a knack for creating games that are easy to play and hugely enjoyable for gamers of all experiences. In Gizmos he turns his hand to the engine building genre. Engine building games are games where you are creating a potential chain of combos that you can set of with actions on your turn or other peoples'. Gizmos is certainly rules light, almost deceptively…
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Description

Phil Walker-Harding has a knack for creating games that are easy to play and hugely enjoyable for gamers of all experiences. In Gizmos he turns his hand to the engine building genre. Engine building games are games where you are creating a potential chain of combos that you can set of with actions on your turn or other peoples'.

Gizmos is certainly rules light, almost deceptively so as some of the engines you can build can combo in surprising ways. Engine building games are games where you are creating a potential chain of combos that you can set of with actions on your turn or other peoples.

In Gizmos you are acquiring cards to play to your tableau which then react to your future actions. On your turn you will choose one of four actions - File, Pick, Build, Research.

File lets you reserve cards from the display so you don’t miss out, but you have limited space to do this. Pick is how you get hold of marbles which are needed to Build cards from your file or the display, and Research lets you draw a number of cards from one of the draw piles and either build or file a card of your choice.

As your tableau builds up, each time you take one of these actions you will trigger bonus actions from your built cards. Each card can only be triggered once per turn but this can still lead to impressively long combos. Combos don’t score you points thought and you’ll soon need to build a few level three cards to content in the end game scoring.

Gizmos is a great game to teach people about engine building games. It will grab people's attention with it’s table presence, with the imposing marble dispenser drawing most of the attention, but they will stay for the enjoyable combo building gameplay.

Player Count: 2-4
Time: 40-50 Minutes
Age: 14+

BLOG

Opening Potion Explosion was joy followed by disappointment. The reassuringly heavy box containing a mass of glass marbles was a sight to behold, until I held them. At that point the marbles were found to be a mix of chipped and misshapen monstrosities. Upon finding that Gizmos employed marbles and a marble dispenser and also came from the same company I tried to contain my expectations...

Gizmos

This time the box was strangely light, but upon opening I found some gloriously round but plastic marbles. This change in material didn't bother me in the slightest as not only are the marbles actually ball shaped, they look great too. The Gizmos dispenser is a somewhat simpler affair than Potion Explosion's, having only one column of marbles to choose from and no explosions in sight. Although its high 'basket' needs to be removed each time to fit back in the box.

The gameplay is simple to learn but about half way through your first play you suddenly realise that you need to build your Gizmos carefully to trigger off as many combinations as possible. Gizmos take the shape of square cards that can be upgrades, converters, or what I call reactors. Upgrades do just that; giving you more storage for marbles and to reserve Gizmos in your archive, converters allow you to change marble colours or quantity.

Reactors are the main meat of the game, as they activate when you take actions that match their type. So, if you have built a Gizmo with a File icon in the top left corner and then take a file action, that Gizmo will activate potentially triggering off any other relevant Gizmos.

On your turn you take one of four potential actions:

  1. File - This allows you to take a Gizmo from the face-up display and put it into your archive.
  2. Pick - Allows you to take a free choice from the dispenser ramp.
  3. Build - Let's you pay the required marbles to build a Gizmo from your archive or the display.
  4. Research - Allows you to take cards from one of the Gizmo piles up to your research level and build or file one of them.

You start with a research level of three, a storage level of five and a archive limit of one. These can be upgraded through Gizmos and to win you are going to want to upgrade once or twice. Reactor cards let you do all sorts of things like take more marbles, gain victory points, build more Gizmos and so on. When some one has built four level three Gizmos or a total of 16 the round plays out and scores are totted up from built Gizmos and earned victory points.

Whizmos

This simple gameplay leads to a interconnected tableau of potential as you try to build your Gizmos to trigger off one another. Each can only activate once per turn, but despite this you can cascade a chain of reactions that can sometimes catch you off guard. The freedom you have to build your Gizmos and therefore your path to victory is great but not overwhelming. I've seen people earn victory points almost every turn, to people who harvest as many marbles as they can before buying the more powerful level three Gizmos.

Player interaction is fairly limited but you can take Gizmos and marbles that other players want, and you do need to watch the other players and what their engines are doing, or you can find yourself lagging behind in points. Although it has to be said that this is nicely balanced as if you chase point making Gizmos you are not earning the stuff you need for building the better scoring Gizmos.

I've been really impressed with Gizmos, its lightweight approach leads to a deeper experience that reveals itself on your first play. Components are mostly great, although the player boards are a little flimsy in the fold area. Play is immediate and turns quick even when triggering numerous reactions. All the actions are useful although on your first few games you may question the worth of the research action, but give it a try as it is a powerful tool.

So, we have a well produced, easy to learn, well priced game that scales well with all player counts - what are you waiting for?

Nick can also be found at Board, Deck & Dice.

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Additional information

Weight 1.22 kg