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The Resistance: Avalon

RRP: £24.99
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RRP £24.99
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The Resistance: AvalonThe Resistance is one of the purest social deduction games there is. Two teams, one trying to succeed and one trying to sabotage. There are more ‘good’ guys, but they don’t know who each other is. Over the course of up to five missions players try to figure out who is trust worthy and who isn’t.In Avalon the resistance takes on an Arthurian theme and le…
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Category Tags , , , , SKU ZBG-IBCAVA1 Availability 3+ in stock
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Awards

Golden Pear
Value For Money

Rating

  • Artwork
  • Complexity
  • Replayability
  • Player Interaction
  • Component Quality

You Might Like

  • Great social interaction
  • Trying to figure out players identities
  • Quick games

Might Not Like

  • That you must be deceiving
  • Can be confrontational
  • It only goes up to 10 player
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Description

The Resistance: Avalon

The Resistance is one of the purest social deduction games there is. Two teams, one trying to succeed and one trying to sabotage. There are more ‘good’ guys, but they don’t know who each other is. Over the course of up to five missions players try to figure out who is trust worthy and who isn’t.

In Avalon the resistance takes on an Arthurian theme and leans into it. Not only are you part of a team but you’ll also take up a character with their own unique power to mess with the status quo. Powers that might be too strong are tempered by restrictions so while Merlin might know who the traitors are they cannot reveal that they are Merlin, leading to bluffs, double bluffs and even fabled QUADRUPLE BLUFFS!

Each player is dealt their role which they keep hidden and then the team leader chooses a number of players (dependant on the player count and round) to go on a mission. Each player on the mission will be given a success and fail card. If you are on the side of good you must choose the success card but if you are evil then you can choose either. Your choice is handed back to the team leader who shuffles them before revealing them. Then follows a discussion about what is revealed. Of course if there is a fail you know at least one of the people who went on the mission is evil…

This leads to multiple accusations and declarations of innocence, the outcome which dictate the mission choices for future rounds. The addition of player powers make for added complexity/variety, giving you a social deduction game that will last awhile!

Player count: 5-10
Time: 30 minutes
Age rating: 13+

The Resistance: Avalon Review

In The Resistance: Avalon, you are a knight of the round table, setting off on quests to save the realm. That is unless you’re one of Mordred’s minions, pretending to be a knight whilst secretly sabotaging those same quests. This is a quick, loud and classic social deduction and bluffing game.

First Impressions

It’s a pretty small box, containing a few different types of cards, tokens and several small player boards (of which one is used dependant on the player count). The components all feel of a good quality and the artwork is nice, but you are unlikely to feel any sense of wonder on opening the box.

There is a small, clear rulebook and set-up is up and running nearly instantly. Even explaining the rules to newcomers won’t take more than a couple of minutes.

Gameplay

Role cards are dealt out at the start of the game to each player, with a set number of good and evil roles dependant on the player count. Someone will read out the script from the rules (pretty easy to learn after a couple of games) and everyone will close their eyes and put their fists in front of them.

The bad guys will open their eyes so they can recognise each other. Then they’ll shut them, and put their thumbs up, so Merlin can open his eyes and identify them (the perks of being a wizard!). Then he’ll shut his eyes, everyone will put their thumbs down, open their eyes and play!

The leader will now pick a certain number of players to go on the first quest (the number dictated by the game board based on the number of players). At this point, there can be an open discussion with people voicing their concerns or validating the choice. This won’t usually happen so much at this stage as only the bad guys and Merlin will have any information, and Merlin can’t reveal himself, as you’ll discover shortly! All players then either place approve or reject tokens face down. These are then revealed and if the majority have approved, the quest goes ahead.

The Resistance: Avalon - Contents

Should there be more rejected tokens or a tie, the quest fails. The leader then moves on to the next player who now chooses those to go on the quest, and the process repeats until either a quest is approved, or there are five rejections in a row, at which point the bad guys win.

Once a quest is approved, each of those players secretly plays a “success” or “fail” card face down and discards the other. The quest must be passed by everyone to succeed. Any fail votes will doom it (although there are a handful of quests that specifically require two or more fails).

Then the leader token passes and everyone moves on to the next quest. Usually preceded by lots of accusations “I told you so”, laughter and discussion.

The Knights need to pass three of the five quests to win. The caveat to this is that the evil players will get one last chance to win if they can assassinate Merlin! They will reveal themselves at this point, discuss and the evil player who was dealt the assassin card will make the choice as to who they deem to be Merlin. Get it right and they have snatched victory at the last! This is a necessary mechanic to ensure that Merlin must subtly influence his team and can’t just reveal who is evil at the start.

The other way for the knights to be defeated is if three or more of the five quests fail.

Advanced roles

There are a few additional roles to introduce once everyone is familiar with The Resistance: Avalon. Percival is a knight who knows who Merlin is, so can ensure he listens to him and can confuse the other team. Mordred isn’t known to Merlin (or the other bad guys). Morgana is evil but appears as Merlin to Percival. And then there is Oberon, who is a bad guy that can’t tell who else is evil, and doesn’t appear to anyone, basically off playing his own game!

So, is The Resistance: Avalon any good?

The Resistance: Avalon is a classic with good reason. It’s quick to pick up and play, and encourages bluffing, lots of debate and arguing. There was a classic game today where not only did the bad guys win, but they left the knights arguing amongst themselves “why did you approve that quest?” “Well, why didn`t you fail the earlier one?”

There is a great mix of logical deduction and intuition and body language at play. The feeling of being evil but persuading the group that you’re good and that it was the other person who failed the quest, is second to none.

The Resistance: Avalon is highly recommended if you enjoy games which are interactive, loud and involve discussion and bluffing.

Avalon, also known as Resistance Avalon, presents a captivating blend of social deduction set against the backdrop of medieval times, echoing the legends of King Arthur’s court. Accommodating 5 to 10 players, Avalon’s premise revolves around identifying the forces of good and evil within the group. Players can opt for straightforward gameplay reminiscent of its predecessor, Resistance, where roles are divided between good and bad factions based on the number of players.

Gameplay Mechanics:

Each round comprises five missions, with a designated leader selecting teammates for each quest. The team’s composition is subject to group approval through a voting mechanism, adding an element of strategy and discussion. Upon mission approval, participants secretly determine the mission’s success or failure, with good players restricted to choosing success while bad players can opt for either outcome. The game escalates as players engage in social deduction, attempting to discern allies from adversaries through keen observation and strategic manipulation.

Character Roles:

Avalon introduces unique character roles such as Merlin and the Assassin, enhancing gameplay dynamics. Merlin gains insight into the identities of evil players but risks exposure to the Assassin’s lethal aim in the game’s climactic finale. Percival, another character, aids the cause of good by identifying Merlin but must navigate the delicate balance of secrecy and revelation. These additional roles inject depth and complexity into the game, allowing for diverse strategies and interactions.

Replayability and Variability:

The game’s replayability is further bolstered by the option to incorporate various character roles, each with its distinct abilities and challenges. While the base game provides a solid foundation for enjoyment, the inclusion of additional characters enriches the experience and fosters strategic diversity.

Player Interaction and Components:

In terms of components, Avalon offers satisfactory quality, though the focus remains on gameplay rather than aesthetics. While the artwork and materials meet expectations, the game’s true essence lies in the dynamic interplay between players and the immersive experience it fosters.

Overall Assessment:

Overall, Avalon stands as a hallmark of party gaming, offering a blend of strategy, intrigue, and social interaction. Its enduring appeal and adaptability make it a valuable addition to any gaming collection, providing countless hours of entertainment for players willing to delve into its world of mystery and deception. However, it’s worth noting that the game might pose challenges for individuals who struggle with deception or find it difficult to engage in role-playing. Additionally, sensitive individuals may find the accusatory nature of the game’s interactions uncomfortable. It’s essential to consider the preferences and comfort levels of all players before diving into Avalon’s immersive experience.

Zatu Score

Rating

  • Artwork
  • Complexity
  • Replayability
  • Player Interaction
  • Component Quality

You might like

  • Great social interaction
  • Trying to figure out players identities
  • Quick games

Might not like

  • That you must be deceiving
  • Can be confrontational
  • It only goes up to 10 player