Space Explorers

RRP: £28.99

NOW £26.99
RRP £28.99

The conquest of space was one of the greatest achievements of the 20th century. In 1957, the first satellite – named Sputnik 1- was launched into orbit. Just four years later, Yuri Gagarin was the first human in space, aboard the spaceship Vostok 1. This game is dedicated to the early space explorers: all the outstanding people who worked to make space travel possible. As Yuri…
Read More
Category Tags , SKU ZBG-HPS25CGG04 Availability 5+ in stock
Share this

Awards

80%

Rating

  • Artwork
  • Complexity
  • Replayability
  • Player Interaction
  • Component Quality

You Might Like

  • The satisfaction of developing a fully function space engine.
  • The gorgeous retro art and beautiful card quality.
  • The flexibility of this game, brilliant in 14 players.

Might Not Like

  • It is like Splendor in that is shares a similar mechanic. Do you need both?
  • The solo mode is hard the first few times you try it.
  • The Symbols are confusing the first game
Find out more about our blog & how to become a member of the blogging team by clicking here

Description

The conquest of space was one of the greatest achievements of the 20th century.
In 1957, the first satellite - named Sputnik 1- was launched into orbit. Just four years later, Yuri Gagarin was the first human in space, aboard the spaceship Vostok 1.

This game is dedicated to the early space explorers: all the outstanding people who worked to make space travel possible. As Yuri Gagarin said at the moment of his launch: “Let's go!”

You are the head of a Research & Development Hub in a Space Research Center, competing with other such Hubs in the spirit of the Golden Age of Astronautics. Your goal is to complete large- scale space projects by gathering the best and brightest minds humanity has to offer.

Thanks to your efforts, satellites, manned spaceships, and orbital stations will be launched into space!

You score Progress points by recruiting Specialists and completing Projects. The game ends when all available Projects are completed, or you have recruited 12 Specialists to your Hub. The player who made the most Progress is the winner!

Key game features:
Closed loop resource system: when recruiting a Specialist to your team, you pass Research tokens to a player to your left.
Specialists are assigned to the Divisions according to their skills. The more Specialists you have in a Division, the easier it is to recruit new ones to that Division.
All Specialists have unique abilities. Only the ability of the top card in each stack is active. Therefore, by adding a new Specialist, you often get a new ability but loose the other one. Think carefully what is more important for you at that moment in the game!

VIDEO

BLOG

space-explorers

In Space, no one can hear you scream.

The game plays 2-4, but with an expansion or a simple piece of paper, you can turn this into a very satisfying solo game. Simply you write Start1-7 and end on a piece of paper and place four project tiles above where you have written start. You then place the first player marker on the first of the six face up specialist cards. Each turn your opponent takes the card the starter tile is on and adds to their hub. The first symbol that this card has, activates any project tiles which have the same symbol on, to move on one space.

Once these tiles reach the end mark, they are given to your opponent. The rest of the game is the same as usual. It is a simple and fun way to learn the game, or simply have some fun on your own, against an opponent that gets a new card every turn! As such, it’s hard to beat but quickly develops your strategies. It has some nice variations for more advanced play as you become more familiar with the mechanic and want a harder challenge. I urge you to try even if you are not a fan of solo gaming. It is quick to learn and play this way, but very satisfying when you start to get a few victories under your space belt.

Beautiful, just Beautiful. Zero degrees and I can go higher.

The artwork in the game is really what made this release stand out for me. The card quality is very high and feels lovely to touch. The retro feel of the art with the slight pastel colours, takes you back to the early space race period and envelops you into the theme. The imagery on the cards is really interesting to look at, often slowing down the game for me as I stare in wonder. I love getting the Astronaut cards, (surely that should be Cosmonaut?) just to look at the picture on the card!

The project tiles are chunky and feel sturdy to the touch, and the rule book is excellent. It is easy to navigate and understand, with a brilliant reference on the side showing you what each page is telling you about.

Space Cowboys, we have a problem?

But is this really a Splendor killer? Simply put, no. For most gamers, one or the other probably will be enough. But if you want and enjoy one, why not have both? They have similar mechanics as I have discussed. But they also have a completely different theme, and differences enough in the game play to make both a worthwhile addition to any collection. If you don’t have Splendor already, I would recommend getting this first, and then if you like it, buy Splendor too! If you already have Splendor and enjoy it, I would suggest adding this to your collection.

I bet you have more than one worker placement game in your collection? Why not two engine builder card games as well! Both are great games and I will happily play both, on the same night, time and time again. The only real question is do I want to go to space first or visit the renaissance?

What a Splendid Game!

Touted as a Splendor killer, Space Explorers landed in 2017 rather quietly! I certainly missed it. But when I heard about a Splendor Killer on the loose, I had to check it out. I love Splendor, its one of my favourite games. It gets to the table more than most. So when a game of similar ilk lands, add in the fact that this game is about Space, and retro 60s Russian Space to boot! I’m sold!

Yuri Zhuravlev is the designer. I have to be honest and say I have never heard of him. He has a few other games out, but nothing that has crossed my path. But I certainly think he is onto a winner here. Splendor came out a few years before, so it must have been an influence on the mechanics. But the artwork and theme that Yuri has added to this game really makes it stand out for me and I will certainly follow his other games more closely now.

To Infinity, and Beyond!

The mechanics of the game are simple and can be seen in the video above. But essentially you are either playing a card into your research and development hub or taking a card to add to your hand. Playing a card requires resources like the chips in Splendor. The genius of Space Explorers is that when you spend your resources they are given to an opponent, rather than back to a central reserve. This makes spending resources feel like a double edge sword. You get what you want with the card being added to your hub, but are you just handing your opponent the victory by giving them the resources they need?

When you add a card into your hub, it then builds up your engine allowing you to acquire new cards a little bit easier. Again, like Splendor, but in Space Explorers, with a twist. The card builds your engine in two potential ways. Each card added to your hub increases your resources of a certain type when playing a card anywhere else, or resources of any type when played into the same space. Building up your engine in this way is wildly satisfying and can cause for some very exciting moments, as more powerful cards are brought into the game in the later stages.

 

Read More >

Additional information

Weight0.6 kg
  • Zatu Review Summary
  • Zatu Score

    80%

    Rating

    • Artwork
    • Complexity
    • Replayability
    • Player Interaction
    • Component Quality

    You might like

    • The satisfaction of developing a fully function space engine.
    • The gorgeous retro art and beautiful card quality.
    • The flexibility of this game, brilliant in 14 players.

    Might not like

    • It is like Splendor in that is shares a similar mechanic. Do you need both?
    • The solo mode is hard the first few times you try it.
    • The Symbols are confusing the first game